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Apple chief executive Tim Cook has stepped up his call for the US to introduce GDPR-style legislation, arguing that American citizens should have the right to track the data that is being collected about them online and delete it if they want to. In an article in Time magazine, Cook said it was time to stand up for the right to privacy. He wrote: "Consumers shouldn’t have to tolerate another year of companies irresponsibly amassing huge user profiles, data breaches that seem out of control and the vanishing ability to control our own digital lives."
Small businesses are proving far more successful than their larger counterparts in tackling the gender imbalance in the tech workforce, according to the inaugural benchmarking report from Government-backed initiative Tech Talent Charter.
Artificial intelligence and cloud services are the joint highest-ranking resources that British employees would most like to see in their daily working lives, with many predicting that these technologies would help them to improve productivity.
Business chiefs may have high expectations for artificial intelligence but only half of companies have policies in place to identify and address the ethical considerations of the technology.
The Geospatial Commission is to work with local authorities across the Midlands to build a new digital map which will identify the best investment and regeneration opportunities across the area.
London has been hailed as the most attractive destination for European technology investment, driven by backing for artificial intelligence and fintech ventures.
Claims that the rise of artificial intelligence will lead to job losses have been dismissed by a new study which shows that more than 40% of businesses are actively recruiting new staff as a result of implementing the technology.
The digital skills gap appears to be narrowing, albeit slowly, according to a new report by Deloitte which shows that digital leaders' confidence in the skills of new entrants to the workplace has improved in the past six months.
Ordnance Survey has signed a deal with Intel-owned Mobileye to deliver high precision road network location data with the aim of enabling a fully connected digital Britain.
The UK's leading tech companies are beginning to build data processing and analytics into all of their departments, processes and technologies, so data and analytics drive not just business decisions but also the core operations of the business itself.
The war on cardiovascular disease is being bolstered by the appliance of data science with the British Heart Foundation and The Alan Turing Institute awarding £550,000 worth of funding to six projects which aim to transform diagnosis and treatment of circulatory conditions.
The Open Data Institute has handed out funding to four local government projects to explore new approaches to publishing and using open geospatial data, including initiatives which will map food banks and cycling routes, as well as tackle accessibility issues.
A Conservative peer’s one-man crusade against British litter-bugs could land him in trouble with the data watchdog, after he
A new report lifts the lid on the digital economy and claims Government estimates of the size of the sector fall way short of reality, with firms based outside London leading the way.
Consumers should be able to demand the instant correction of personal data held about them by the Government or companies which provide Government services, according to MPs sitting on a Parliamentary committee.
Companies looking to upgrade their computer systems are being warned to ensure they wipe off all personal data stored on
Fears are growing that the European Union will railroad support for its proposed update of European data laws by exploiting the privacy backlash created by the US Prism snooping scandal.
Business chiefs have admitted they see their own staff as the greatest threat to corporate data and computer systems – with many companies showing an “alarmingly casual approach” to keeping information secure.
Sony has thrown in the towel over its fight against the £250,000 fine from the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), despite vowing to challenge the ruling because it was a result of a “determined criminal attack”.

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